Marten Quickstart with .Net Core HostBuilder

The Marten Community just released Marten 3.12 with a mix of new functionality and plenty of bug fixes this past week. In particular, we added some new extension methods directly into Marten for integration into .Net Core applications that are bootstrapped by the new generic host builder in .Net Core 3.*.

There’s a new runnable, sample project in GitHub called AspNetCoreWebAPIWithMarten that contains all the code from this blog post.

For a small sample ASP.Net Core web service project using Marten’s new integration, let’s start a new web service project with the dotnet new webapi template. Doing this gives you some familiar files that we’re going to edit in a bit:

  1. appsettings.json — standard configuration file for .Net Core
  2. Program.cs — has the main command line entry point for .Net Core applications. We aren’t actually going to touch this right now, but there will be some command line improvements to Marten v4.0 soon that will add some important development lifecycle utilities that will require a 2-3 line change to this file. Soon.
  3. Startup.cs — the convention based Startup class that holds most of the configuration and bootstrapping for a .Net Core application.

Marten does sit on top of Postgresql, so let’s add a docker-compose.yml file to the codebase for our local development database server like this one:

version: '3'
services:
 postgresql:
 image: "clkao/postgres-plv8:latest"
ports:
 - "5433:5432"

At the command line, run docker-compose up -d to start up your new Postgresql database in Docker.

Next, we’ll add a reference to the latest Marten Nuget to the main project. In the appsettings.json file, I’ll add the connection string to the Postgresql container we defined above:

"ConnectionStrings": {
  "Marten": "Host=localhost;Port=5433;Database=postgres;Username=postgres;password=postgres"
}

Finally, let’s go the Startup.ConfigureServices() method and add this code to register Marten services:

public class Startup
{
    // We need the application configuration to get
    // our connection string to Marten
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
    }

    public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
         // This line registers Marten services with all default
         // Marten settings
         var connectionString = Configuration.GetConnectionString("Marten");
         services.AddMarten(connectionString);

         // And some other stuff we don't care about in this post...

And that’s it, we’ve got Marten configured in its most basic “getting started” usage with these services in our application’s IoC container:

  1. IDocumentStore with a Singleton lifetime. The document store can be used to create sessions, query the configuration of Marten, generate schema migrations, and do bulk inserts.
  2. IDocumentSession with a Scoped lifetime for all read and write operations. By default, this is done with the IDocumentStore.OpenSession() method and the session created will have the identity map behavior
  3. IQuerySession with a Scoped lifetime for all read operations against the document store.

Now, let’s build out a very rudimentary issue tracking web service to capture and persist new issues as well as allow us to query for existing, open issues:

public class IssueController : ControllerBase
{
// This endpoint captures, creates, and persists
// new Issue entities with Marten
[HttpPost("/issue")]
public async Task<IssueCreated> PostIssue(
[FromBody] CreateIssue command,
[FromServices] IDocumentSession session)
{
var issue = new Issue
{
Title = command.Title,
Description = command.Description
};

// Register the new Issue entity
// with Marten
session.Store(issue);

// Commit all pending changes
// to the underlying database
await session.SaveChangesAsync();

return new IssueCreated
{
IssueId = issue.Id
};
}

[HttpGet("/issues/{status}/")]
public Task<IReadOnlyList<IssueTitle>> Issues(
[FromServices] IQuerySession session,
IssueStatus status)
{
// Query Marten's underlying database with Linq
// for all the issues with the given status
// and return an array of issue titles and ids
return session.Query<Issue>()
.Where(x => x.Status == status)
.Select(x => new IssueTitle {Title = x.Title, Id = x.Id})
.ToListAsync();
}

// Return only new issues
[HttpGet("/issues/new")]
public Task<IReadOnlyList<IssueTitle>> NewIssues(
[FromServices] IQuerySession session)
{
return Issues(session, IssueStatus.New);
}
}

And that is actually a completely working little application. In its default settings, Marten will create any necessary database tables on the fly, so we didn’t have to worry about much database setup other than having the new Postgresql database started in a Docker container. Likewise, we didn’t have to subclass any kind of Marten service like you would with Entity Framework Core and we most certainly didn’t have to create any kind of Object/Relational Mapping just to get going. Additionally, we didn’t have to care too awfully much about how to get the right Marten services integrated into our application’s IoC container with the right scoping because that’s all handled for us with the UseMarten() extension method that comes out of the box with Marten 3.12 and greater.

In a follow up post later this week, I’ll show you how to customize the Marten service registrations for per-HTTP request multi-tenancy and traceable, contextual logging of Marten-related SQL execution.

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