BlueMilk is Ready for Early Adopters

This was renamed “Lamar” because the feedback on the name was, um, not good:)

 

EDIT 2/14/2018: And this already brought out a bug if you have a type that would need a closed generic type as an argument to its constructor. 0.7.1 will follow very shortly on Nuget.

 

BlueMilk is the name of a new OSS Inversion of Control tool I’m building specifically for usage in Jasper applications, but also as a higher performant replacement for StructureMap in Netstandard 2.0 applications going forward. To read more about what is genuinely unique about its internals and approach, see Jasper’s Roslyn-Powered “Special Sauce.”

I’m declaring BlueMilk 0.7 on Nuget right now as ready for enterprising, early adopter types to try out either on its own or within an ASP.Net Core application. At this point it’s passing all the ASP.Net Core compliance tests with a couple exceptions that I can’t possibly imagine being important in many cases (like the order in which created objects are disposed and a really strange way they order objects in a list when there’s mixed open and closed generic type registrations). It’s also supporting quite a few StructureMap features that I missed while trying to work with the built in DI container.

As I said in the introductory post, you can use BlueMilk as either a drop in replacement for the built in ASP.Net Core DI tool or as a faster subset of StructureMap for a much more richer feature set.

Current Feature Set

In most cases, the BlueMilk feature and API is identical to StructureMap’s and I’ll have to send you to the StructureMap documentation for more explanation.

Caveats

  • I’m wrestling with the 1st usage, warm up time just due to how long it takes Roslyn to bootstrap itself on its very first usage. What I’ve come up with so far is to have the dynamic classes for services registered as singletons or scoped be built on the initial startup, but allowing any other resolvers be built lazily the first time they are actually used. This is an ongoing struggle.
  • The lifecycle scoping is different than idiomatic StructureMap. I opted to give up and just use the ASP.Net team’s new definition for what “transient” and “scoped” means.
  • There is a dependency for the moment on a library called Baseline, that’s just my junk drawer of convenience extension methods (leftovers from FubuCore for anyone that used to follow FubuMVC). Before BlueMilk hits 1.0, I’ll internalize those extension methods somehow and eliminate that dependency

Using within ASP.Net Core Applications

You’ll want to pull down the BlueMilk.Microsoft.DependencyInjection package to get the ASP.Net Core bootstrapping shim — and blame the ASP.Net team for the fugly naming convention.

In code, plugging in BlueMilk is done through the UseBlueMilk() extension method as shown below:

var builder = new WebHostBuilder();
builder
    .UseBlueMilk()
    .UseUrls("http://localhost:5002")
    .UseKestrel()
    .UseStartup();

Pretty standard ASP.Net Core stuff. Using their magical conventions on the Startup class, you can do specific BlueMilk registrations using a ConfigureContainer(ServiceRegistry) method as shown below:

public class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureContainer(ServiceRegistry services)
    {
        // BlueMilk supports the ASP.Net Core DI
        // abstractions for registering services
        services.AddLogging();

        // And also supports quite a few of the old 
        // StructureMap features like type scanning
        services.Scan(x =>
        {
            x.AssemblyContainingType<SomeMarkerType>();
            x.WithDefaultConventions();
        });

     }

 // Other stuff we don't care about here
}
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6 thoughts on “BlueMilk is Ready for Early Adopters

  1. Jeff Putz

    The convention-based mapping alone is worth it, and the thing most sorely missing from the built-in container in ASP.NET Core.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: The Morning Brew - Chris Alcock » The Morning Brew #2527

  3. Mark Rendle

    Love the compatibility with ASP.NET Core DI extension methods! And thank you for your continuing .NET OSS work. You are an example to us all.

    Reply
  4. Pingback: Dew Drop - February 14, 2018 (#2665) - Morning Dew

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