Lamar 4.1: Multithreading improvements, diagnostics, documentation updates, and some thoughts on troubleshooting

As promised in my previous post My (Big) OSS Plans for 2020, the very first thing out the gate for me this year is a bug fix release for Lamar.

Lamar 4.1 and its related libraries was released on Nuget late last week with a variety of bug fixes, a couple new features, and a documentation refresh at https://jasperfx.github.io/lamar — including some new guidance here and there as a direct reaction to GitHub issues. Continuing my personal theme of OSS interactions being more positive than not over the past couple years, I received a lot of help from Lamar users. This release was largely the result of users submitting pull requests with fixes or failing unit tests that reproduced issues — and I cannot stress enough how helpful those reproduction tests are for an OSS maintainer. Another user took the time to investigate how an error message could be greatly improved. Thank you to all the users who helped on this release with pull requests, suggestions, and feedback on GitHub.

All told, the libraries updated are:

  • Lamar 4.1.0 — Multi-threading issues were finally addressed, fixes for Lamar + ASP.Net Core logging, some finer grained control over type scanning registrations
  • Lamar.Microsoft.DependencyInjection v4.1.0 — Adds support back for IWebHostBuilder for .Net Core 3.0 applications
  • Lamar.Diagnostics v1.1.3 — More on this one below
  • LamarCompiler 2.1.1 — Just updated the Roslyn dependencies. Lamar itself doesn’t use this, so you’re very unlikely to be impacted
  • LamarCodeGeneration v1.4.0 — Some small additions to support a couple Jasper use cases
  • LamarCodeGeneration.Commands v1.0.2 — This isn’t documented yet, and is really just to support some diagnostics and pre-generation of code for Jasper

 

A Note on Troubleshooting

I have a partially written blog post slash treatise on troubleshooting and debugging. One of the things I try to suggest when troubleshooting a technical issue is to come up with a series of theories about why something isn’t working and figuring out the quickest way to prove or disprove that theory.

In the case of Lamar’s multi-threading issues addressed in this release and a very similar issue fixed previously, the “obvious” theory was that somewhere there was some issue with data structures or locking. Myself and several others tried to investigate Lamar’s internals down this path, but came up empty handed.

The actual root cause turned out to be related to the Expression construction and compilation inside of Lamar that allowed variables to bleed through threads in heavily multi-threaded usage.

So, I still think that my idea of “build a theory about why something is failing, then try to knock it down” is a good approach, but not 100% effective. I’m adding a section to that blog post entitled “don’t get tunnel vision” and talk about fixating on one theory and not considering other explanations;-)

Then again, some things are just hard some time.

Lamar.Diagnostics

Back in October I blogged about the new Oakton.AspNetCore package that extends the command line capabilities of standard .Net Core / ASP.Net Core applications with additional diagnostics. As a drop in extension to Oakton.AspNetCore, the new Lamar.Diagnostics package can be installed into a .Net Core application to give you ready access to all of Lamar’s built in diagnostics through the command line.

Your newly available commands from the root of your project with Lamar.Diagnostics are:

  1. dotnet run -- lamar-services — prints out the Container.WhatDoIHave() output to the console or a designated file
  2. dotnet run -- lamar-scanning — prints out the Container.WhatDidIScan() output to the console or a designated file
  3. dotnet run -- lamar-validate — runs the Container.AssertConfigurationIsValid() command

You can also opt into Lamar’s built in environment tests being used through Oakton.AspNetCore’s environment check capability.

In all cases, these commands work by calling IHostBuilder.Build() to build up your application — but doesn’t call Start() so none of your IHostedService objects will run — and calls the underlying Container methods. By doing this, you get ready access to the Lamar diagnostics against your application exacstly the way that your applicaiton is configured, without you having to add any additional code to your system to get at this diagnostic information.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Lamar 4.1: Multithreading improvements, diagnostics, documentation updates, and some thoughts on troubleshooting

  1. Pingback: The Morning Brew - Chris Alcock » The Morning Brew #2904

  2. Pingback: Dew Drop – January 7, 2020 (#3106) | Morning Dew

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