A Vision for Stateful Resources at Development or Deployment Time

As is not atypical, I found a couple little issues with both Oakton and Jasper in the course of writing this post. To that end, if you want to use the functionality shown here yourself, just make sure you’re on at least Oakton 4.6.1 and Jasper 2.0-alpha-3.

I’ve spit out quite a bit of blogging content the past several weeks on both Marten and Jasper:

I’ve been showing some new integration between Jasper, Marten, and Rabbit MQ. This time out, I want to show the new “stateful resource” model in a third tool named Oakton to remove development and deployment time friction when using these tools on a software project. Oakton itself is a command line processing tool, that more importantly, can be used to quickly add command line utilities directly to your .Net executable.

Drawing from a sample project in the Jasper codebase, here’s the configuration for an issue tracking application that uses Jasper, Marten, and RabbitMQ with Jasper’s inbox/outbox integration using Postgresql:

using IntegrationTests;
using Jasper;
using Jasper.Persistence.Marten;
using Jasper.RabbitMQ;
using Marten;
using MartenAndRabbitIssueService;
using MartenAndRabbitMessages;
using Oakton;
using Oakton.Resources;

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);

builder.Host.ApplyOaktonExtensions();

builder.Host.UseJasper(opts =>
{
    // I'm setting this up to publish to the same process
    // just to see things work
    opts.PublishAllMessages()
        .ToRabbitExchange("issue_events", exchange => exchange.BindQueue("issue_events"))
        .UseDurableOutbox();

    opts.ListenToRabbitQueue("issue_events").UseInbox();

    opts.UseRabbitMq(factory =>
    {
        // Just connecting with defaults, but showing
        // how you *could* customize the connection to Rabbit MQ
        factory.HostName = "localhost";
        factory.Port = 5672;
    });
});

// This is actually important, this directs
// the app to build out all declared Postgresql and
// Rabbit MQ objects on start up if they do not already
// exist
builder.Services.AddResourceSetupOnStartup();

// Just pumping out a bunch of messages so we can see
// statistics
builder.Services.AddHostedService<Worker>();

builder.Services.AddMarten(opts =>
{
    // I think you would most likely pull the connection string from
    // configuration like this:
    // var martenConnectionString = builder.Configuration.GetConnectionString("marten");
    // opts.Connection(martenConnectionString);

    opts.Connection(Servers.PostgresConnectionString);
    opts.DatabaseSchemaName = "issues";

    // Just letting Marten know there's a document type
    // so we can see the tables and functions created on startup
    opts.RegisterDocumentType<Issue>();

    // I'm putting the inbox/outbox tables into a separate "issue_service" schema
}).IntegrateWithJasper("issue_service");

var app = builder.Build();

app.MapGet("/", () => "Hello World!");

// Actually important to return the exit code here!
return await app.RunOaktonCommands(args);

Just to describe what’s going on up above, the .NET code above is going to depend on:

  1. A Postgresql database with the necessary tables and functions that Marten needs to be able to persist issue data
  2. Additional tables in the Postgresql database for persisting the outgoing and incoming messages in the inbox/outbox usage
  3. A Rabbit MQ broker with the necessary exchanges, queues, and bindings for the issue application as it’s configured

In a perfect world, scratch that, in an acceptable world, a developer should be able to start from a fresh clone of this issue tracking codebase and be able to run the system and/or any integration tests locally almost immediately with very minimal friction along the way.

At this point, I’m a big fan of trying to run development infrastructure in Docker where it’s easy to spin things up on demand, and just as quickly shut it all down when you no longer need it. To that end, let’s just say we’ve got a docker-compose.yml file for both Postgresql and Rabbit MQ. Having that, I’ll type docker compose up -d from the command line to spin up both infrastructure elements.

Cool, but now I need to have the database schemas built out with Marten tables and the Jasper inbox/outbox tables plus the Rabbit MQ queues for the application. This is where Oakton and its new “stateful resource” model comes into play. Jasper’s Rabbit MQ plugin and the inbox/outbox storage both expose Oakton’s IStatefulResource interface for easy setup. Likewise, Marten has support for this model as well (in this case it’s just a very slim wrapper around Marten’s longstanding database schema management functionality).

If you’re not familiar with this, the double dash “–” argument in dotnet run helps .NET to know which arguments (“run”) apply to the dotnet executable and the arguments to the right of the “–” that are passed into the application itself.

Opening up the command line terminal of your preference to the root of the project, I type dotnet run -- help to see what options are available in our Jasper application through the usage of Oakton:

There’s a couple commands up there that will help us out with the database management, but I want to focus on the resources command. To that end, I’m going to type dotnet run -- resources list just to see what resources our issue tracker application has:

Just through the configuration up above, the various Jasper elements have registered “stateful resource” adapters to for Oakton for the underlying Marten database, the inbox/outbox data (Envelope Storage above), and Rabbit MQ.

In the next case, I’m going to use dotnet run -- resources check to see if all our infrastructure is configured the way our application needs — and I’m going to do this without first starting the database or the message broker, so this should fail spectacularly!

Here’s the summary output:

If you were to scroll up a bit, you’d see a lot of exceptions thrown describing what’s wrong (helpfully color coded by Spectre.Console) including this one explaining that an expected Rabbit MQ queue is missing:

So that’s not good. No worries though, I’ll start up the docker containers, then go back to the command line and type:

dotnet run -- resources setup

And here’s some of the output:

Forget the command line…

If you’ll notice the single line of code `builder.Services.AddResourceSetupOnStartup();` in the bootstrapping code above, that’s adding a hosted service to our application from Oakton that will verify and apply all configured set up to the known Marten database, the inbox/outbox storage, and the required Rabbit MQ objects. No command line chicanery necessary. I’m hopeful that this will enable developers to be more productive by dealing with this kind of environmental setup directly inside the application itself rather than recreating the definition of what’s necessary in external scripts.

This was a fair amount of work, so I’d be very welcome to any kind of feedback here.

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