Storyteller 4.0 is Out!

Storyteller is a long running project for authoring human readable, executable specifications for .Net projects. The new 4.0 release is meant to make Storyteller easier to use and consume for non technical folks and to improve developer’s ability to troubleshoot specification failures.

After about 5 months of effort, I was finally able to cut the 4.0 Nugets for Storyteller this morning and the very latest documentation updates. If you’re completely new to Storyteller, check out our getting started page or this webcast. If you’re coming from Storyteller 3.0, just know that you will need to first convert your specifications to the new 4.0 format. The Storyteller Fixture API had no breaking changes, but the bootstrapping steps are a little bit different to accommodate the dotnet CLI.

You can see the entire list of changes here, or the big highlights of this release are:

  • CoreCLR Support! Storyteller 4.0 can be used on either .Net 4.6 projects or projects that target the CoreCLR. As of now, Storyteller is now a cross platform tool. You can read more about my experiences migrating Storyteller to the CoreCLR here.
  • Embraces the dotnet CLI. I love the new dotnet cli and wish we’d had it years ago. There is a new “dotnet storyteller” CLI extensibility package that takes the place of the old ST.exe console tool in 3.0 that should be easier to set up for new users.
  • Markdown Everywhere! Storyteller 4.0 changed the specification format to a Markdown plus format, added a new capability to design and generate Fixture’s with markdown, and you can happily use markdown text as prose within specifications to improve your ability to communicate intentions in Storyteller specifications.
  • Stepthrough Mode. Integration tests can be very tricky to debug when they fail. To ease the load, Storyteller 4.0 adds the new Stepthrough mode that allows you manually walk through all the steps of a Storyteller specification so you can examine the current state of the system under test as an aid in troubleshooting.
  • Asynchronous Grammars. It’s increasingly an async-first kind of world, so Storyteller follows suit to make it easier for you to test asynchronous code.
  • Performance Assertions. Storyteller already tracks some performance data about your system as specifications run, so why not extend that to applying assertions about expected performance that can fail specifications on your continuous integration builds?

 

Other Things Coming Soon(ish)

  • A helper library for using Storyteller with ASP.Net Core applications with some help from Alba. I’m hoping to recreate some of the type of diagnostics integration we have today with Storyteller and our FubuMVC applications at work for our newer ASP.net Core projects.
  • A separate package of Selenium helpers for Storyteller
  • An extension specifically for testing relational database code
  • A 4.1 release with the features I didn’t get around to in 4.0;)

 

How is Storyteller Different than Gherkin Tools?

First off, can we just pretend for a minute that Gherkin/Cucumber tools like SpecFlow may not be the absolute last word for automating human readable, executable specifications?

By this point, I think most folks associate any kind of acceptance test driven development or truly business facing Behavioral Driven Development with the Gherkin approach — and it’s been undeniably successful. Storyteller on the other hand, was much more influenced by Fitnesse and could accurately be described as a much improved evolution of the old FIT model.

SpecFlow is the obvious comparison for Storyteller and by far the most commonly used tool in the .Net space. The bottom line for me with Storyteller vs. SpecFlow is that I think that Storyteller is far more robust technically in how you can approach the automated testing aspect of the workflow. SpecFlow might do the business/testing to development workflow a little better (but I’d dispute that one too with the release of Storyteller 4.0), but Storyteller has much, much more functionality for instrumenting, troubleshooting, and enforcing performance requirements of your specifications. I strongly believe that Storyteller allows you to tackle much more complex automated testing scenarios than other options.

Here is a more detailed list about how Storyteller differs from SpecFlow:

  • Storyteller is FOSS. So on one hand, you don’t have to purchase any kind of license to use it, but you’ll be dependent upon the Storyteller community for support.
  • Instead of parsing human written text and trying to correlate that to the right calls in the code, Storyteller specifications are mostly captured as the input and expected output. Storyteller specifications are then “projected” into human readable HTML displays.
  • Storyteller is much more table centric than Gherkin with quite a bit of functionality for set-based assertions and test data input.
  • Storyteller has a much more formal mechanism for governing the lifecycle of your system under test with the specification harness rather than depending on an application being available through other means. I believe that this makes Storyteller much more effective at development time as you cycle through code changes when you work through specifications.
  • Storyteller does not enforce the “Given/When/Then” verbiage in your specifications and you have much more freedom to construct the specification language to your preferences.
  • Storyteller has a user interface for editing specifications and executing specifications interactively (all React.js based now). The 4.0 version makes it much easier to edit the specification files directly, but the tool is still helpful for execution and troubleshooting.
  • We do not yet have direct Visual Studio.Net integration like SpecFlow (and I’m somewhat happy to let them have that one;)), but we will develop a dotnet test adapter for Storyteller when the dust settles on the VS2017/csproj churn.
  • Storyteller has a lot of functionality for instrumenting your specifications that’s been indispensable for troubleshooting specification failures and even performance problems. The built in performance tracking has consistently been one of our most popular features since it was introduced in 3.0.

 

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2 thoughts on “Storyteller 4.0 is Out!

  1. Pingback: Storyteller 4.0 released - How to Code .NET

  2. Pingback: Dew Drop - February 16, 2017 (#2423) - Morning Dew

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