Lamar and Oakton join the .Net Core 3.0 Party

Like many other .Net OSS authors, I’ve been putting in some time this week making sure that various .Net tools support the brand spanking new .Net Core and ASP.Net Core 3.0 bits that were just released. First up is Oakton and Lamar, with the rest of the SW Missouri projects to follow soon.

Oakton

Oakton is yet another command line parser tool for .Net. The main Oakton 2.0.1 library adds support for the Netstandard2.1 target, but does not change in any other way. The Oakton.AspNetCore library got a full 2.0.0 release. If you’re using ASP.Net Core v2.0, your usage is unchanged. However, if you are targeting netcoreapp3.0, the extension methods now depend on the newly unified IHostBuilder rather than the older IWebHostBuilder and the bootstrapping looks like this now:

public class Program
{
    public static Task<int> Main(string[] args)
    {
        return CreateHostBuilder(args)
            
            // This extension method replaces the calls to
            // IWebHost.Build() and Start()
            .RunOaktonCommands(args);
    }

    public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(x => x.UseStartup<Startup>());
    
}

 

Oakton.AspNetCore provides an improved and extensible command line experience for ASP.Net Core. I’ve been meaning to write a bigger blog post about it, but that’s gonna wait for another day.

Lamar

The 3.0 support in Lamar was unpleasant, because the targeting covers the spread from .Net 4.6.1 to netstandard2.0 to netstandard2.1, and the test library covered several .Net runtimes. After this, I’d really like to not have to type “#if/#else/#endif” ever, ever again (and I do use ReSharper/Rider’s ALT-CTRL-J surround with feature religiously that helps, but you get my point).

The new bits and releases are:

  • Lamar v3.2.0 adds a netstandard2.1 target
  • LamarCompiler v2.1.0 adds a netstandard2.1 target (probably only used by Jasper, but who knows who’s picked it up, so I updated it)
  • LamarCodeGeneration v1.1.0 adds a netstandard2.1 target but is otherwise unchanged
  • Lamar.Microsoft.DependencyInjection v4.0.0 — this is the adapter library to replace the built in DI container in ASP.Net Core with Lamar. This is a full point release because some of the method signatures changed. I deleted the special Lamar handling for IOption<T> and ILogger<T> because they no longer added any value. If your application targets netcoreapp3.0, the UseLamar() method and its overloads hang off of IHostBuilder instead of IWebHostBuilder. If you are remaining on ASP.Net Core v2.*, UseLamar() still hangs off of IWebHostBuilder
  • Lamar.Diagnostics v1.1.0 — assuming that you use the Oakton.AspNetCore command line adapter for your ASP.Net Core application, adding a reference to this library adds new commands to expose the Lamar diagnostic capabilities from the command line of your application. This version targets both netstandard2.0 for ASP.Net Core v2.* and netstandard2.1 for ASP.Net Core 3.*.

 

The challenges

The biggest problem was that in both of these projects, I wanted to retain support for .Net 4.6+ and netstandard2.0 or netcoreapp2.* runtime targets. That’s unfortunately meant a helluva lot of conditional compilation and conditional Nuget references per target framework. In some cases, the move from the old ASP.Net Core <=2.* IWebHostBuilder to the newer, unified IHostBuilder took some doing in both the real code and in the unit tests. Adding to the fun is that there are real differences sometimes between the old, full .Net framework, netcoreapp2.0, netcoreapp2.1/2, and certainly the brand new netcoreapp3.0.

Another little hiccup was that the dotnet pack pathing support was fixed to what it was originally in the project.json early days, but that broke all our build scripts and that had to be adjusted (the artifacts path is relative to the current directory now rather than to the binary target path like is was).

At least on AppVeyor, we had to force the existing image to install the latest .Net SDK as part of the build because the image we were using didn’t yet support the brand new .Net SDK. I’d assume that is very temporary and I can’t speak to other hosted CI providers. If you’re wondering how to do that, see this example from Lamar that I got from Jimmy Byrd.

 

Other Projects I’m Involved With

  • StructureMap — If someone feels like doing it, I’d take a pull request to StructureMap.Microsoft.DependencyInjection to put out a .Net Core 3.0 compatible version (really just means supporting the new IHostBuilder instead of or in addition to the old IWebHostBuilder).
  • Alba — Some other folks are working on that one, and I’m anticipating an Alba on ASP.Net Core 3.0 release in the next couple days. I’ll write a follow up blog post when that’s ready
  • Marten — I’m not anticipating much effort here, but we should at least have our testing libraries target netcoreapp3.0 and see what happens. We did have some issues with netcoreapp2.1, so we’ll see I guess
  • Jasper — I’ve admittedly had Jasper mostly on ice until .Net Core 3.0 was released. I’ll start work on Jasper next week, but in that is going to be a true conversion up to netcoreapp3.0 and some additional structural changes to finally get to a 1.0 release of that thing.
  • Storyteller — I’m not sure yet, but I’ve started doing a big overhaul of Storyteller that’s gotten derailed by the .Net Core 3.0 stuff

 

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