My professional and OSS aspirations for 2022

I trot out one of these posts at the beginning of each year, but this time around it’s “aspirations” instead of “plans” because a whole lot of stuff is gonna be a repeat from 2020 and 2021 and I’m not going to lose any sleep over what doesn’t get done in the New Year or not be open to brand new opportunities.

In 2022 I just want the chance to interact with other developers. I’ll be at ThatConference in Round Rock, TX in January May? speaking about Event Sourcing with Marten (my first in person conference since late 2019). Other than that, my only goal for the year (Covid-willing) is to maybe speak at a couple more in person conferences just to be able to interact with other developers in real space again.

My peak as a technical blogger was the late aughts, and I think I’m mostly good with not sweating any kind of attempt to regain that level of readership. I do plan to write material that I think would be useful for my shop, or just about what I’m doing in the OSS space when I feel like it.

Which brings me to the main part of this post, my involvement with the JasperFx (Marten, Lamar, etc). family of OSS projects (plus Storyteller) which takes up most of my extracurricular software related time. Just for an idea of the interdependencies, here’s the highlights of the JasperFx world:

.NET Transactional Document DB and Event Store on PostgreSQL

Marten took a big leap forward late in 2021 with the long running V4.0 release. I think that release might have been the single biggest, most complicated OSS release that I’ve ever been a part of — FubuMVC 1.0 notwithstanding. There’s also a 5.0-alpha release out that addresses .Net 6 support and the latest version of Npgsql.

Right now Marten is a victim of its own success, and our chat room is almost constantly hair on fire with activity, which directly led to some planned improvements for V5 (hopefully by the end of January?) in this discussion thread:

  • Multi-tenancy through a separate database per tenant (long planned, long delayed, finally happening now)
  • Some kind of ability to register and resolve services for more than one Marten database in a single application
  • And related to the previous two bullet points, improved database versioning and schema migrations that could accommodate there being more than one database within a single .Net codebase
  • Improve the “generate ahead” model to make it easier to adopt. Think faster cold start times for systems that use Marten

Beyond that, some of the things I’d like to maybe do with Marten this year are:

  • Investigate the usage of Postgresql table partitioning and database sharding as a way to increase scalability — especially with the event sourcing support
  • Projection snapshotting
  • In conjunction with Jasper, expand Marten’s asynchronous projection support to shard projection work across multiple running nodes, introduce some sort of optimized, no downtime projection rebuilds, and add some options for event streaming with Marten and Kafka or Pulsar
  • Try to build an efficient GraphQL adapter for Marten. And by efficient, I mean that you wouldn’t have to bounce through a Linq translation first and hopefully could opt into Marten’s JSON streaming wherever possible. This isn’t likely, but sounds kind of interesting to play with.

In a perfect, magic, unicorns and rainbows world, I’d love to see the Marten backlog in GitHub get under 50 items and stay there permanently. Commence laughing at me on that one:(

Jasper is a toolkit for common messaging scenarios between .Net applications with a robust in process command runner that can be used either with or without the messaging.

I started working on rebooting Jasper with a forthcoming V2 version late last year, and made quite a bit of progress before Marten got busy and .Net 6 being released necessitated other work. There’s a non-zero chance I will be using Jasper at work, which makes that a much more viable project. I’m currently in flight with:

  • Building Open Telemetry tracing directly into Jasper
  • Bi-directional compatibility with MassTransit applications (absolutely necessary to adopt this in my own shop).
  • Performance optimizations
  • .Net 6 support
  • Documentation overhaul
  • Kafka as a message transport option (Pulsar was surprisingly easy to add, and I’m hopeful that Kafka is similar)

And maybe, just maybe, I might extend Jasper’s somewhat unique middleware approach to web services utilizing the new ASP.Net Core Minimal API support. The idea there is to more or less create an improved version of the old FubuMVC idiom for building web services.

Lamar is a modern IoC container and the successor to StructureMap

I don’t have any real plans for Lamar in the new year, but there are some holes in the documentation, and a couple advanced features could sure use some additional examples. 2021 ended up being busy for Lamar though with:

  1. Lamar v6 added interception (finally), a new documentation website, and a facility for overriding services at test time
  2. Lamar v7 added support for IAsyncEnumerable (also finally), a small enhancement for the Minimal API feature in ASP.Net Core, and .Net 6 support

Add Robust Command Line Options to .Net Applications

Oakton did have a major v4/4.1 release to accommodate .Net 6 and ASP.Net Core Minimal API usage late in 2021, but I have yet to update the documentation. I would like to shift Oakton’s documentation website to VitePress first. The only plans I have for Oakton this year is to maybe see if there’d be a good way for Oakton to enable “buddy” command line tools to your application like the dotnet ef tool using the HostFactoryResolver class.

The bustling metropolis of Alba, MO

Alba is a wrapper around the ASP.Net Core TestServer for declarative, in process testing of ASP.Net Core web services. I don’t have any plans for Alba in the new year other than to respond to any issues or opportunities to smooth out usage from my shop’s usage of Alba.

Alba did get a couple major releases in 2021 though:

  1. Alba 5.0 streamlined the entry API to mimic IHost, converted the documentation website to VitePress, and introduced new facilities for dealing with security in testing.
  2. Alba 6.0 added support for WebApplicationFactory and ASP.Net Core 6

Solutions for creating robust, human readable acceptance tests for your .Net or CoreCLR system and a means to create “living” technical documentation.

Storyteller has been mothballed for years, and I was ready to abandon it last year, but…

We still use Storyteller for some big, long running integration style tests in both Marten and Jasper where I don’t think xUnit/NUnit is a good fit, and I think maybe I’d like to reboot Storyteller later this year. The “new” Storyteller (I’m playing with the idea of calling it “Bobcat” as it might be a different tool) would be quite a bit smaller and much more focused on enabling integration testing rather than trying to be a BDD tool.

Not sure what the approach might be, it could be:

  • “Just” write some extension helpers to xUnit or NUnit for more data intensive tests
  • “Just” write some extension helpers to SpecFlow
  • Rebuild the current Storyteller concept, but also support a Gherkin model
  • Something else altogether?

My goals if this happens is to have a tool for automated testing that maybe supports:

  • Much more data intensive tests
  • Better handles integration tests
  • Strong support for test parallelization and even test run sharding in CI
  • Could help write characterization tests with a record/replay kind of model against existing systems (I’d *love* to have this at work)
  • Has some kind of model that is easy to use within an IDE like Rider or VS, even if there is a separate UI like Storyteller does today

And I’d still like to rewrite a subset of the existing Storyteller UI as an excuse to refresh my front end technology skillset.

To be honest, I don’t feel like Storyteller has ever been much of a success, but it’s the OSS project of mine that I’ve most enjoyed working on and most frequently used myself.

Weasel

Weasel is a set of libraries for database schema migrations and ADO.Net helpers that we spun out of Marten during its V4 release. I’m not super excited about doing this, but Weasel is getting some sort of database migration support very soon. Weasel isn’t documented itself yet, so that’s the only major plan other than supporting whatever Marten and/or Jasper needs this year.

Baseline

Baseline is a grab bag of helpers and extension methods that dates back to the early FubuMVC project. I haven’t done much with Baseline in years, and it might be time to prune it a little bit as some of what Baseline does is now supported in the .Net framework itself. The file system helpers especially could be pruned down, but then also get asynchronous versions of what’s left.

StructureMap

I don’t think that I got a single StructureMap question last year and stopped following its Gitter room. There are still plenty of systems using StructureMap out there, but I think the mass migration to either Lamar or another DI container is well underway.

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